Posts by Bernie Boteilho

Volcanoes National Park Reopens on September 22nd at 10:00am

The park reopens on Saturday which will be awesome. We will now be able to all of the changes that occurred during these past few months. Due to the collapsing of Halemaumau Crater. Things have settled down but this does not mean Madame Pele is done. There are still areas  and trails that will be closed to the public. There will be long lines and limited parking. For more information, go to https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/basicinfo.htm

These are the following areas that will be open on Saturday.

Reopening map phase I

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes
Special Reopening Advisory

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Hawai i Volcanoes National Park
www.nps.gov/havo

Profound changes, new Most of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park closed on May 11, 2018 due to increased
dangers volcanic and seismic activity of Kīlauea volcano. Over the next twelve weeks large lava
flows covered land southeast of the park destroying over 700 homes and devastating
residential areas in the Puna District. At the same time, the summit area of the park was
dramatically changed by tens of thousands of earthquakes, towering ash plumes, and 62
massive collapse explosions. The events caused profound damage to park infrastructure
unprecedented in the park’s 102 year history including building damage, rock falls, deep
cracks in roads and trails, and numerous breaks to water and sewer lines. Now, with the
eruption paused, there is no molten lava to see in the park. As the park reopens and
recovers, visitors should take extra precautions to remain safe during their visit. Visitors
should expect limited services and parking, long lines, and no potable water.

WARNING: HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

Park areas remain unstable and unsafe from thousands of recent earthquakes and caldera
collapses.
 Stay on open trails and roads! Closed trails and roads are
dangerous, do not enter.
 Stay away from cracks and sinkholes. Falls into cracks have
seriously injured and killed people. Cracks have unstable edges,
do not approach them!
 Rockfalls are unpredictable. Pay attention and keep away
from all cliffs.
 Wear sturdy shoes and long pants, falling on lava rock is like
falling on broken glass.
 Do not hike after dark. Even those who know the area must be
cautious due to new hazards.

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is a wild place. The dramatic landscape of Kīlauea is
constantly being shaped by powerful and uncontrollable natural forces. Respect the
dangers of this dynamic natural process and stay out of closed areas.

Images and Information Courtesy of Volcanoes National Park

Fissure 8 No Longer Pumping Out Lava to the East Rift Zone

 

During this morning’s USGS over flight of Fissure 8.There was a weak to moderately active pond of lava bubbling within the fissure 8 cone, but no visible supply of lava from fissure 8 into the channel. The perched channel and braided sections downstream were essentially crusted over with some incandescence noted. Active flow in the channel was observed immediately west Kapoho Crater. There is still active lava flowing into the ocean along the coast. it stretches about a mile long as of this morning. The Pohoiki Boat Ramp and Red House is still standing but there is some activity there. It did not have any significant advancement over the weekend.

Hawaii Volcano Observatory geologists observed low levels of lava fountaining  within the fissure 8 spatter cone and crusted lava in the spillway and channel downstream. The significance of this change is not yet clear. Eruptions can wax and wane or pause for days to weeks before returning to high levels of lava discharge. New outbreaks in the area of the active fissures could also occur in the near future.

 

Photos Courtesy of: USGS

 

Collapse at the Summit this Morning.

A collapse event occurred this morinng at the summit of Kilauea (July 24, 2018) at 6:41am HST, releasing energy equivalent to a magnitude-5.3 earthquake, which is similar to that released by previous collapse events. In this video, watch as today’s event unfolds from the perspective of HVO’s live-stream camera. At 6:41:08 (time stamp at upper left), a small tree along the right margin of the video begins to sway. At 6:41:10, a pressure wave passes through the steam plume in the crater, and light is reflected back to the camera (highlights the passage of the expanding sound energy through the air. At 6:41:11, a rockfall begins on the South Sulphur Banks, a distant light-colored scarp on the left

Pohoiki Boat Landing is Still There.

 

Lava update with Ikaika Marzo abound Ohana of Kalapalana Cultural Tours. This live update was at 6:08 pm today July 24, 2018. The lave entry is about 3 miles long with lots of entries into the ocean. The lava is at the parking lot but Pohoiki is stil there for now. The lava has extended about 100 yards into the ocean where Shack’s and Bow’s were located.

Live at the ocean entry aboard lava vessel OHANA.

Posted by Ikaika Marzo on Tuesday, July 24, 2018

View of Fissure 8 with Halau Performing a Hawaiian Chant and Prayer

Had the privilege in escorting a Halau into the Leilani Blvd area to do Native Hawaiian ceremony and prayer. Mahalo to Civil Defense and Hawaii’s Finest, Hawaii Police Department for giving us the opportunity to make it happen for these Hawaiians. It was a spiritual moment for myself and also everyone there. Unreal evening!!! #alohaforpuna #stayclassypuna

Posted by Ikaika Marzo on Saturday, June 16, 2018

250 Acres Created by the Lava Flow

Flowing lava creates at least 250 acres of new land on Big Island

Incredible new images show lava hitting the sea off Kapoho and forming new land.LATEST: https://buff.ly/2MjOAVm#HINews #HNN

Posted by Hawaii News Now on Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Halemaumau is forever changed. The Lava Lake has disappeared.

UAS survey of Halema‘uma‘u crater rim, at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit, June 13, 2018.

A UAS mission on June 13, 2018, filmed details of the dramatic changes occurring within Halema’uma’u crater at Kīlauea's summit. Clearly visible are the steep crater walls that continue to slump inward and downward in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit. The deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim.This video was taken from a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems). Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. The overflights collect visual information on what is happening at this rapidly changing eruption site. Scientists will be examining the footage in detail to understand how the expanding collapse area is evolving, the extent of tephra fall, and other clues as to what is happening at Kīlauea's summit. This information informs assessment of hazards, which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.Video by the U.S. Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services, Department of the Interior, with support from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption

Posted by USGS Volcanoes on Wednesday, June 13, 2018

USGS

UAS mission on June 13, 2018, filmed details of the dramatic changes occurring within Halema’uma’u crater at Kīlauea’s summit. Clearly visible are the steep crater walls that continue to slump inward and downward in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit. The deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim.

This video was taken from a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems). Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. The overflights collect visual information on what is happening at this rapidly changing eruption site. Scientists will be examining the footage in detail to understand how the expanding collapse area is evolving, the extent of tephra fall, and other clues as to what is happening at Kīlauea’s summit. This information informs assessment of hazards, which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.

Video by the U.S. Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services, Department of the Interior, with support from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.